Posts in Category: abstract

Bittersweet

We have some of the biggest Bittersweet vines I have ever seen growing in the pines at the edge of our yard. I mean big! 5 inches in diameter near the ground, with shaggy, deeply patterned bark, and growing up the tree to the very top, 50 feet or more. The berries are way up there. In fact I did not identify the vines as bittersweet for many years, until I saw the berry cluster one day in the top of the tree. These ripe berries fell to the ground under the tree and I found them when putting up my photo blind for a session the other day. They make a striking still-life in the grass and pine needles. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent using Sony’s full-time macro. This is full frame…only cropped horizontally. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Abstracts of Autumn #4

This is one of the reddest trees I have found this fall, and already with over half its leaves on the ground. We had an early turn, then rain, then high winds, so the fall, or at least the fall foliage, was fleeting this year. Sony Rx10iv at 30mm equivalent. Program mode with HDR. Nominal exposure: ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/640th. Processed in Apple Photos.

Abstracts of Autumn #3

Another shot from my search for seasonal abstracts at Laudholm Farms in Wells, Maine. Sony Rx10iv at 73mm equivalent. Program mode with HDR. Nominal exposure: ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/400th. -.3EV. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Abstracts of Autumn #2

A particularly red maple overgrown with Bittersweet vine, with the berries just at the yellow stage. Color and texture and shape. Another seasonal abstract. Sony Rx10iv at 227mm equivalent. Program mode with HDR. Nominal exposure: ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/500th. Processed in Apple Photos. Laudholm Farms, Wells, Maine.

Abstracts of Autumn #1

I went out on my eBike yesterday, specifically to look for foliage photos…not landscape shots, but photos featuring the patterns, colors, and textures of the season. Abstracts. I will post a few over the next few days. Fall is passing fast this year, with more than half the leaves off the trees already, and with still a week to go before traditional peak foliage. What can I say? It is 2020. This shot, and those that follow, were taken at Laudholm Farms in Wells, Maine. Sony Rx10iv at 67mm equivalent. Program with HDR. Nominal exposure: ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/400th. Processed in Apple Photos.

Silver Birch

Silver Birch in September afternoon light. All about texture and shadow and highlight. Laudholm Farms, Wells, Maine. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Blue Dasher, with sparkles.

Sometimes it is the “other” stuff in a photo that makes it’s appeal. In this case a portrait of a Blue Dasher dragonfly on a reed at the pond at Southern Maine Medical Center here in Kennebunk is transformed by the sparkles on the water, and what the lens does to them. The circles are actually refraction patterns formed when the light, reflecting off the water behind the dragonfly, passes through the diaphragm of the lens (the little hole that controls how much light gets to the sensor). The pattern they make lifts this dragonfly portrait out of the ordinary. Or that is what I think anyway. 🙂 Sony Rx10iv at 600mm. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Abstact in marsh grass

This is a somewhat awkward season in Southern Maine for photography…and, as it happens, I am rarely in Maine in August. The bird life is kind of quiet, dragonflies and not in flight as much, and we often have blue sky days…not my favorite for landscapes. I generally attend the Tucson Birding Festival the first part of the month and for the past two years have been in Africa late in the month. This year, of course, I am home. 🙂 So, here is a somewhat random abstract shot from along the Bridle Path in Kennebunk. I love what the water and wind does with the salt grass, and what the weather and the years have done to the posts. Sony Rx10iv at about 170mm equivalent. HDR mode. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Red like a Sumac

The Sumac plumes are bright red this week. I found this one along Water Street here in Kennebunk just beyond the Roger’s Pond turnoff. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Macro at the long end of the zoom in program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Bronze in passing

Something a bit different today. Along the back side of the loop at the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, there was a land slippage on the high bank over Branch Brook last spring that took an overlook and part of the trail with it. One of the tall spruces that was on the edge of the bank is now down near the river, leaning against the back and out over the trail. It did not survive the fall, and is now slowly turning brown. They will get to it with a chainsaw one of these days soon, but for now it is like a rich bronze casting over the trail, especially in afternoon light. I moved in close and tried several different compositions out at the long end of the zoom, in an attempt to capture the effect. Sony Rx10iv at about 440mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications (which I also use for macro). Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.