Posts in Category: Rachel Carson NWR

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Jack-in-the-pulpit: Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells, Maine, USA — taking a break from lupines for a day 🙂 I know of one place where I might find Jack-in-the-pulpits growing “in the wild” but have not gotten there yet this year. This plant is from the small and very overgrown demonstration garden (some ranger’s, or more likely, summer intern’s, good idea from several years ago, now pretty much abandoned) at the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters buildings in Wells Maine. The Jack-in-the-pulpit is a very strange flower…with a very strange name…but I am always delighted to find one growing where I can photograph it. Nikon B700 at about 80mm equivalent with Macro setting. Program mode with my standard birds and wildlife settings. -.3 EV. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Painted Trillium

Painted Trillium: Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells, Maine, USA — It used to be, not so many years ago, that the Trilliums were bloomed and gone before the first Lady Slipper Orchid was in full bloom…but these past few years they have bloomed together…and both seem to be blooming later. Maybe I am misremembering, and certainly my sample is too small to draw any conclusions. All I know is that after several trips to find them at Rachel Carson, I was happy to see them blooming near the Lady Slippers. Painted is the only Trillium we have here in Southern Maine, or at least the only one I have found. Nikon B700, the first two macro at 107mm equivalent and the third at 1440 equivalent from about 15 feet. Program mode. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Ovenbird

Ovenbird: Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells, Maine, USA — I was almost back to the car when this tiny bird hopped across the path and then proceeded to walk up and down a long dead tree trunk among the leaves and dense brush. I did a lot of very quiet scurrying myself, trying to find a clear view of the moving bird, and managed this one shot. I have seen them closer and more in the open at Magee Marsh in Ohio, but this is the best sighting I have had in Maine. 🙂 It really takes a camera as agile as the Sony Rx10iv to capture a bird in this kind of situation. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. ISO 800 @ f4 @ 1/500th.

December sky

We have had a lot of moody days this early winter. At least they make for dramatic skies. This is Branch Brook at high tide, on its way to join the Merriland River to become the Little, on the back side of the trail at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters. Sony Rx10iv at 24mm equivalent. Program with auto HDR. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. Nominal exposure: ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/320th.

Merriland River early winter panorama

Something even more different than yesterday’s landscape for the Pic of the day…a sweep panorama under the same brooding sky…looking out over the Merriland River as it heads for its junction with Branch Brook at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. Sony Rx10iv at 24mm. Sweep panorama mode. +1 EV (necessary on this camera for this mode, and this scene could have actually used more compensation). Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. Nominal exposure ISO 100 @ f5.6 @ 1/250.

One more mushroom

Mushrooms will happen! It is amazing (to me) how powerful they are…pushing up through a layer of matted leaves…and not just a little pointy thing like a plant shoot…no, a whole platter lifting a big chunk of the forest floor. 🙂 At Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells Maine. Sony Rx10iv at about 290mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

More mushrooms…

One of the things I like about mushrooms is the variety of shapes and colors and forms. This cluster of small mushrooms, probably in a symbiotic relationship with the tree, is a case in point. Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Headquarters trail, Wells, Maine. Sony Rx10iv at 211mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Mushroom time…

Of course there are mushrooms all summer, but September seems to be an abundant month for them in the woods of Southern Maine. These are bursting out along the trail at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters in Wells, Maine. The biggest one is just smaller than a dinner plate, and as you can see from the second photo, they are massive mushrooms. There will be lots more as the leaves begin to turn in a few weeks. Sony Rx10iv at

135mm equivalent ISO 800 @ f4 @ 1/320th
47mm equivalent ISO 200 @ f3.2 @ 1/100th

Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Jack-in-the-pulpit

The parking lot and trail at the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge here in Southern Maine has been closed until just this past weekend, so I have not been able to check on this year’s crop of Jack-in-the-pulpits near the bike rack were they have been growing for several years. Now that the parking lot is open, I stopped by on my eBike to see what was up. I suspect the first plants were transplanted as part of a “wild garden” concept, which has since gone completely wild. The Jacks that grow there are the largest I have ever seen…way larger than I could have ever imagined Jack-in-the-pulpits could get. The oldest plants are over 3 feet tall with many pulpits…and some of the pulpits themselves are 6 inches in length. The leaves can be a foot long. These are really big plants. And they are spreading. There are now two smaller plants along side the bike rack that were definitely not there last year. 🙂 Sony Rx10iv at various focal lengths (the Sony has full time macro focus). Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Bronze in passing

Something a bit different today. Along the back side of the loop at the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, there was a land slippage on the high bank over Branch Brook last spring that took an overlook and part of the trail with it. One of the tall spruces that was on the edge of the bank is now down near the river, leaning against the back and out over the trail. It did not survive the fall, and is now slowly turning brown. They will get to it with a chainsaw one of these days soon, but for now it is like a rich bronze casting over the trail, especially in afternoon light. I moved in close and tried several different compositions out at the long end of the zoom, in an attempt to capture the effect. Sony Rx10iv at about 440mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications (which I also use for macro). Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.