Posts in Category: backyard photo-blind

That old sunflower seed dance…

Black-capped Chickadee: Kennebunk, Maine, USA — another shot with the lovely light of early November in Maine…highlighting the typical sunflower seed dance of the Black-capped Chickadee. You wonder about the efficiency of a chickadee eating sunflower seeds. Can the bird really get back the energy used to open the seed? Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. 1/500th @ f4 @ ISO 250.

More Nuthatch antics…

White-breasted Nuthatch: Kennebunk, Maine, USA — Nuthatches are always fun to watch as they get up to (and down to) the strangest things. This one almost escaped the frame, but I caught him at the edge and was able to crop for composition. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. ISO 160 @ f4 @ 1/500th.

Titmouse in the November shade…

Tufted Titmouse: Kennebunk, Maine, USA — If the November sun is a different kind of light, the November shade is a different kind of shade. All summer photography under the pines were one set of feeders are was difficulty because of the abundance of vegetation and the depth of the shade. Now, as the leaves are mostly fallen, and the light is coming in more obliquely, and from across the yard as opposed to behind the house, the open shade under the pines is becoming slightly more photographically assessable. This Tufted Titmouse only sat for a second, as is their habit, but long enough for a couple of frames. The light brings out the subtle hues of the bird’s plumage. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. ISO 1000 @ f4 @ 1/500th.

Hairy in the fall…

Hairy Woodpecker: Kennebunk, Maine, USA — We have a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers who visit the yard most days…not as often as the Downy woodpeckers, but at least once a day. I caught this one stripping bark off a dead limb in search of insects, against the backdrop of the autumn oaks. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. ISO 160 @ f4 @ 1/500th. Cropped considerably.

Why you have to photograph every Chickadee :)

Black-capped Chickadee, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — I wrote a poem the other day about how taking photos of Chickadees is “paying your photographic dues” so you are ready when a real rarity shows up at your feeders…but there is, as this photo demonstrates, more to it than that. You just never know when a Chickadee (or other common bird) is going to display an interesting behavior. I would not have gotten this shot if I had not already been focused on the bird when it happened. In fact I was in the middle of a burst of photos already that started with the bird nicely posed on the branch. This just happened. 🙂 And that is the way it works. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch, Kennebunk, Maine, USA. Still coming into full breeding plumage. My backyard bird / photo blind is proving to be very satisfying, and very productive. The opportunity to observe and photograph my backyard birds this close, without disturbing them in any way, is new to me, and I am enjoying it immensely. Odd as it seems, I will have the pandemic to thank for this. I would not have gone to the expense and effort of setting it up if not for the “stay at home” advice. I ordered a hanging water feeder and bird bath to add to my setup. I expect I will be using the blind a lot this spring and summer. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Pixelmator Photo.