Posts in Category: birds

Band-tailed Seedeater

Not the most exciting bird in the world, and widespread even in Peru, this is the Band-tailed Seedeater from the same roadside stop where we saw the Mountain Finch from yesterday’s post, on the highway from Cusco to Paucartambo, Peru. A little digital trickery here to show you two views of the same bird. Sony RX10iv at 1200mm equivalent (600mm optical plus 2x Clear Image Zoom). Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and a assembled in Pixomatic.

Chestnut-breasted Mountain Finch

I am working back through my photos from my Birding the Manu Road adventure with Amazon Journeys more or less in order. This is from the first day, still on the highway to Purcartambo (where the Manu Road really begins). We pulled off in a “likely spot” on one of the hairpin turns to walk a ways and see what we could see. This is the Chestnut-breasted Mountain Finch, a lovely little bird the Birds of Peru guide lists as rare and local throughout its limited range on the mid-range dry slopes of the Andes. Sony RX10iv at 1200mm equivalent (600mm optical plus 2x Clear Image Zoom). Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr.

What you missed from Peru

On my Birding the Manu Road adventure with Amazon Journeys and Pepe Rojas, we had very limited wifi, and I only posted a few images to Facebook. So here is a recap of what you missed.

Long-tailed Sylph, Wayqecha Lodge, Peru. One of my target birds for sure!
Masked (Mountain) Trogon, downslope from Wayqecha Lodge, on the Manu Road in Peru.
Andean Cock-of-the-Rock, Cock-of-the-Rock Lodge on the Manu Road, Peru
Hooded Mountain Tanager, perhaps my favorite Tanager, from along the Manu Road at Cloud Forest elevation.
We worked hard to find the Hoatzin, an ancient and unique species, in an oxbow off the Amazon in Northern Peru. They were yard birds at Villa Carmin Biological Station at foothill level on the Manu Road in southern Peru.
Barred Fruiteater, the largest of the Fruiteaters, along the Manu Road at Cloud Forest elevation.
Sapphire-spangled Emerald on the grounds of Villa Carmin Biological Station on the Manu Road in southern Peru.
Blue and Yellow Macaw, resident on the grounds of Villa Carmin Biological Station on the Manu Road.
Bearded Mountaineer Hummingbird, from dry western slopes of the Andes on my first day, still on the way to Manu Road.
Mass of butterflies where a sugary drink was spilled on the Manu Road. I only recognize the Blue Doctor (or equivalent).
And finally, just to prove I did it, a selfie at Machu Picchu.

Bare-faced Ground-Dove

Along the west side of Haucarpay Lake east of Cusco, Peru, in the scrubby landscape between the town and lake, we discovered this Bare-faced Ground-Dove, a common bird of the area. It almost got away from me over a little rise in the ground. Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr. I was on the Birding the Manu Road adventure with Amazon Journeys.

Hooded Siskin

Sorry about the gap here, but I find it difficult to post while traveling with limited wifi. I have been in Peru for 10 days, on the Birding the Manu Road adventure with Amazon Journeys and then in Machu Picchu on an overnight from Cusco. I will post a catch up post featuring the images I managed to post from the road soon. For now, on our way out of Cusco on the first day, we stopped at Huacarpay Lake, a typical high altitude lake on the east slope of the Andes, in hopes of some water birds. Along the shore as we were leaving, we encountered a large and busy flock of Hooded Siskins feeding in brush in an empty lot. The Hooded Siskin is a lot like our American Goldfinch, in both looks and behavior. This shot shows both males and females. Sony RX10iv at 1200mm equivalent (600mm optical plus 2x Clear Image Zoom). Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr.

Gold Finch

We put up a new feeder pole on the other corner of the deck this week, along with a branch I saved from pruning the cherry tree last fall. The birds started using it immediately. I also added one of those metal screen thistle feeders to replace the thistle sock, which never, in the past three years, attracted a single Finch. That too was a success. The Goldfinches, which came to the Black-oil Sunflower Seed feeders even if they did not come to the thistle sock, started using the screen thistle feeder on the second day. They also like the cherry tree branch, which is straight in line with the deck door and easily visible from the breakfast table…if I am careful I can get the door open a crack before the birds fly, hence this shot of a Gold Finch at close range. Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr.

Red-winged Acrobatics

More shots of the acrobatic Red-winged Blackbird from a few days ago at the drainage pond at Southern Maine Medical Center in Kennebunk. Endlessly entertaining…unless they are at your feeder :). (And maybe even then, depending on your tolerance.) Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr. Assembled in Framemagic.

Tom Turkey in the tall grass

The other day, while out on a photoprowl on my ebike, I happened on two large flocks of Wild Turkeys…or maybe it was one huge flock and I just saw both ends of it while it was spread out over 600 yards or so…along the road into our local beach. There were two big handsome Toms at the very far end of the two groups, feeding in tall grass. When I stopped my bike one of them decided to disappear so it sat down in the grass with only its head sticking up. As though that bright red head would be inconspicuous in the green grass. 🙂 600mm and 1200mm equivalents (1200 with 2x Clear Image Zoom). Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and assembled in FrameMagic.

Red-winged Blackbird

While dragonfly hunting the other day, out on my ebike, the Red-winged Blackbirds entertained me around the little drainage pond at Southern Maine Medical Center here in Kennebunk. The males were super vocal. I am not sure if they were responding to each other or to me being at their pond! This one hopped from cattail reed to cattail reed about 30 feet from me for as long as I wanted to watch, yelling at the top of his lungs. Though they are common, Red-winged Blackbirds are not easy to photograph. It took some careful post-processing to being out the subtle plumage details in the black on black bird. Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Tree Swallow in a Wood Duck box.

They have put up two new Wood Duck boxes at Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area, complete with sheet metal shields below to protect the nests from predators…but as you might expect, the Tree Swallows have taken both. Hopefully, if Wood Ducks decided to nest there, they will evict the swallows. 🙂 In the meantime the swallows seem happy with their new accommodations. The nice big door/window makes an ideal perch to survey the world. Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr.