Posts in Category: hummingbird

Juvenile Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird: Bear Canyon Campground, Santa Fe National Forest, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA — I shared one shot if this juvenile Rufous Hummingbird at these flowers in the Bear Canyon Campground above Santa Fe, New Mexico a week or so ago, but I can not leave my New Mexico experience without sharing a couple more poses. The Hummer was very busy and remained around the flowers long enough so that I got a number of keeper shots. In these two you can see the the distinguishing features on the front side of the bird. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos, assembled in FrameMagic. ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/500th.

Juvenile Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird: Bear Canyon Camp Ground, Santa Fe National Forest, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA — As we came back down through the Bear Canyon Camp Ground after our hike up Bear Canyon trail, we saw a number of juvenile Rufous Hummingbirds working the wildflowers. I attempted to catch one several times before this bird decided to cooperate, and hovered long enough for a few shots. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. ISO 100 @ f4 @ 1/500th.

Ruby-throated

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: Kennebunk, Maine, USA — When you only have one species of hummingbird, you learn to appreciate what you have…and the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds we get here in Southern Maine are easy to appreciate. I know we have at least 2 coming to our feeder…both males…since just once I saw them both making an attempt on the feeder at the same time. Yesterday, while out filling the seed feeders on the deck, one of them came in to use the feeder when I was just passing it, about a 18 inches away. I froze…literally froze in position and did not move…and after some dithering and dancing in the air, probably deciding if it was hungry enough to risk it while I was standing there so close, the hummer came in and fed for two or three minutes…then zoomed away. It was amazing to stand so close I could see every feather in the gorget when it flashed. These photos are cropped from images with the 600mm equivalent lens on the Sony RX10iv, from about 12 feet, and through double pane glass, but they capture a bit of the close up effect. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos (with the protruding feeder poll removed in TouchRetouch). ISO 640 @ f4 @ 1/500th.

Sub-adult Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — We have a pair of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds coming to our sugar water feeder many times a day, and have had all summer. I have seen them returning often to the pines over my feeding station by my back-yard photo blind, but if they are nesting there, the nest is too high for me to find it in the branches. There are at least two younger birds around now. This sub-adult male came and hovered right outside the window of my blind…eye to eye with me, and then at least toyed with the idea of bathing in my water bucket fountain, before perching very briefly for this shot…in the deep shade of course, but we take what we can get for hummingbirds here in Maine. 🙂 Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Female Volcano Hummingbird at the feeder

In my experience, Volcano Hummingbirds rarely come to feeders, and I was surprised to see this female at the feeder at Batsu Gardens in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, even though Volcano Hummingbirds are common there, and I had seen both males and females feeding in the flowers around the viewing platform. This one came to a feeder only 4 feet from me, right at the closest focus of my camera. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Pic of the Day 2: Alternative display of Lesser Violet-ear

The alternative dominance display of the Lesser Violet-ear Hummingbird. This is what they do when they aren’t wing posturing. Cleary where the violet-ear name comes from. Batsu Gardens in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Lesser Violet-ear displaying

The Lesser Violet-ear was the Green Violet-ear until recently. In its range it is the most aggressive hummingbird. It actually spends more time in dominance displays and defending food sources than it does feeding. Though it seems counterproductive, the strategy seems to work for this bird…as it is also among the most numerous hummer in its range. It’s displays involve both wing posturing, as in this photo, and flaring out those violet-ears until they stand away from the head pretty much their full length. This one is at Batsu Gardens in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Stripe-tailed Hummingbird

This Stripe-tailed Hummingbird was the rarest species at Batsu Gardens in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica when we visited in December. We only saw it a few times and we never did find where it perched away from the feeders. The stripe-tailed is easiest recognized, despite its name, by the highly visible patch of rufous on its wing. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Talamanca Hummingbird

A Talamanca Hummingbird faces off with an “intruder” to his dominion. All hummingbirds spend a lot of time in dominance displays, especially around artificial feeding stations, like those at the Batsu Gardens in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica. In this case it looks like the intruder is a female Talamanca, so it is only competition for the feeder, not a threat to the territory. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

White-throated Mountain Gem

A male White-throated Mountain Gem from the Batsu Gardens above Savegre Mountain Hotel in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica. Batsu Gardens is a delightful spot on the side of the mountain…a terrace with native plantings, hummingbird and fruit feeders, a sheltered patio, restrooms, and fresh coffee. You have to reserve ahead of time and you are driven up there on benches in the back of a 4 wheel drive truck. It is a experience not to be missed when visiting the Valley of the Quetzals and San Gerardo de Dota. The birds you see there vary by season and by day…but in December there were lots of Mountain Gems, Talamanca Hummingbirds, Volcano Hummingbirds, Scintillant Hummingbirds, and a few Stripe-tailed Hummingbirds. At the fruit feeders we had Silver-throated Tanager, Sooty-capped Chlorospingus, and the brilliant Golden-browed Chlorophonia. At the edge of the forest we had Buff-throated Quail Dove. And I am missing some. Quite a place. But the White-throated Mountain Gems were certainly a highlight. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.