Posts in Category: wildlife

Pickerel Frog

Pickerel Frog, Old Falls on the Mousam River, Lyman, Maine — I went looking for a bridge to play my low whistle under (for the acoustics, just for fun), and while at Old Falls on the Mousam River, I, of course, went for a walk down the river looking for dragonflies and birds. Not may of either around, but there were little Pickerel Frogs all over the place. Beautiful little creatures, with their rich colors and interesting patterns, and great light. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

I see you…

Tufted Titmouse, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — Most of the birds that work the feeders by my chair blind do not seem to know I am there…and, of course, the Chickadees simply do not care…but occasionally a bird will obviously indicate that it has seen me. or seen something where I a sitting inside the blind. It might be just a flash of light reflected from my lens, or they might actually see me. This Titmouse certainly seems very aware of my presence…suddenly aware…and very interested. It only gave me a moment of its attention before deciding, apparently, that I was no threat and getting on with its foraging. This is a good thing. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — The Red-breasted Nuthatches have been getting a lot of attention lately, but of course the White-breasted, which are much more regular at our feeders, are still around. The trick is catching them away from the feeders. 🙂 Patience and persistence. I don’t believe in luck, but I do believe in being in right place at the right time and ready. In this case, in my chair blind and with my camera in my hand. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Titmouse at the fountain

Tufted Titmouse, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — I spent a few hours in my chair photo blind yesterday. Some days it is all about chickadees, but yesterday was all about titmice. There were at least 3, and they were very active…much more than usual. This one came into my bucket water fountain for a drink a couple of times while I watched. The water feature is only about 5 feet from where I set up the blind. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

‘nother Nuthatch

Red-breasted Nuthatch, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — Okay, they are just too cute. Irresistible photo subjects. Another shot from my chair blind in the back yard. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Big Tom

Wild Turkey, Laudholm Farms, Wells, Maine, USA — Yesterday it was completely overcast all day, so I did not take my “real camera” with me when I went out for a purely exercise bike ride…and, of course, I saw over 40 Wild Turkeys in 4 different flocks…two flocks of Hens and Janes and chicks, and two flocks of Toms and Jakes. This is one of two mature Toms strutting their stuff along the road in to the Laudholm Farms (Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve). Taken with my “back-up travel camera”, a Panasonic Lumix ZS-60, at about 400mm equivalent. Program mode: ISO 125 @ f6 @ 1/100th. -.3 EV. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Monarchs and Northern Blazing Star

Kennebunk Barrens Nature Conservancy, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — I had been disappointed in the crop of Northern Blazing Star on the Kennebunk Plains (now known, after the most recent changes in management, as the “Kennebunk Barrens Nature Conservancy”) after the prescribed burn of last September. Northern Blazing Star is an endangered flower, with a very limited range, and the Kennebunk Plains is one of its last strongholds. It is a fire dependent plant, and needs periodic fires to maintain a healthy population. I will admit, I did not know exactly what to expect after the fire, but I was hoping for a bumper crop this year…and we did not see that…at least until the last few days in August. It might be that the bloom was just later than usual due to the fire, or that it was late due to an abnormally dry July and August, but it was certainly late. We had some tropical storm remnants come through the last days of August, with some significant rain, and suddenly there are a lot of Blazing Star in bloom on the plains. Not the best crop I have seen, but better that it looked like it was going to be this year. We also had a sudden influx of Monarch butterflies. This has happened other years, but I am always surprised. This year I have seen, until last week, maybe a half dozen individual Monarchs…few enough to be somewhat worried. Even when the Milkweed was in bloom, there were very few Monarchs to be seen. However, when the Blazing Star finally bloomed, I saw more individuals in one day than in the rest of the summer. It was hard to get a count as they were actively feeding on the Blazing Star and moving from patch to patch, but first impression was that they were every where…and maybe about 20 individuals in the few acres along the shore of the pond there. It makes me wonder were they have been all summer…or if they are newly emerged to match the timing of the Blazing Star bloom?? They were certainly “fresh” looking butterflies. Sony Rx10iv at 24mm equivalent in HDR mode for the landscape, and at 600mm equivalent in Program with my custom birds and wildlife modifications for the butterfly. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

More Chickadee antics

Black-capped Chickadee, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — And here we are with yet another example of why you have to photograph all the chickadees all the time…or at least watch them closely. You just never know what they are going to get up to. Our Black-capped Chickadees have learned to use the hanging water feeder for their drinking needs, but that does not mean they do not still enjoy a bath. 🙂 Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.

Peeps!

Semi-palmated Sandpipers, Kennebunk, Maine, USA — There was a flock of peeps working the tidal shore along Back Creek behind our local beach the other day. I don’t get out on the actual beach in the summer, since we have crowds of tourists every day. I did not attempt the beach during a good summer, and certainly not during the pandemic. Still, it was great to see the Semi-palmated Sandpipers in good numbers by the river. They are fun to watch. Always busy and somehow perky. Perky peeps! That is good. 🙂 Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos. If you look carefully, you can actually see the “semi-palm” in a couple of the shots here.

Confusing Red Meadowhawks of Autumn

It is the season for small red Meadowhawks, or maybe it is just that the Autumn Meadowhawks are so abundant right now that they draw attention to the other, closely related, species. Meadowhawk identification is not for the faint hearted, but I will take a stab at it. I think I have here, top to bottom, Autumn, with its yellowish legs, White-faced, and Ruby. They were all taken at the same small pond that drains the parking lot at the Southern Maine Medical Center in Kennebunk, Maine. Sony Rx10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with my custom birds and wildlife modifications. Processed in Polarr and Apple Photos.