Monthly Archives: June 2018

Ladybug, Ladybird…

Asian Multi-colored Ladybird, Laudholm Farms, Wells, Maine

This Ladybug caught my eye on my last photoprowl to Laudholm Farms (Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve). How could it not? Especially ensconced on the bright green leaf. It was blowing around in the wind, so I had to resort to tracking auto focus to get a sharp shot, and even then I only really got one out of a burst of a dozen or more. A little research this morning reminded me that individual species of Ladybugs most often are named “Ladybird”…this is, I think, the Multi-colored Asian Ladybird…invasive in most parts of North America, and worldwide. It is one of the few Ladybirds with more than 7 spots. Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode with tracking auto focus. 1/1000th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Polarr.

Wine-throated Hummingbird

Wine-throated Hummingbird, La Tigra National Park, Honduras

I am working on my article on the Birds Honduras trip to the highlands of Honduras, so I am looking back through the images. I posted a single shot of the Wine-throated Hummingbird Alex Alvarado found for me in La Tigra National Park above Tegucigalpa. It really deserves more! I told the story briefly of following Alex as he bushwhacked off the trail to a precarious vantage on this bird as it fed and returned to one of several perches in front of us. We were literally balanced on fallen trees covered with vines and buried in reeds, and the way in was beset with thorny plants and stuff in the undergrowth that I do not want to think about. Worth it though. One of the most amazing hummers I have ever seen. Tiny! We were maybe 30 feet from its perches and this is the best I could do at 600mm…and heavily cropped at that. Sony RX10iv. Program mode. 1/500th @ f4 @ ISO 125. Processed in Polarr and assembled in FrameMagic.

Tom Turkey!

Tom Turkey, Laudholm Farms, Wells Maine

I have known for a while that this Tom Turkey must exist. I have see his harem out and about at Laudholm Farms, and in the yards near the entrance, but this is the first time I have seen him…at least in several years. He is a magnificent specimen, and never more magnificent than when on full display as in these shots. He was guarding his harem as they fed…keeping the tail spread and the full fluff on. What can I say? A sight to be seen! Sony RX10iv at 600mm equivalent. Program mode. 1/500th @ f4 @ ISO 500. Processed in Polarr.

Laudholm June Wildflowers

Blue Flag Iris, Blue Eyed Grass, Rose Pagonia Orchid, Wild Rose, Sheep Laurel, Nightshade, Owl Clover, Cinquefoil, Milkweed.

On my recent photoprowl to Laudholm Farms (Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve) Rose Pagonia was not the only wildflower blooming (see last Sunday’s The Generous Eye post). This is a panel of 9 of the wildflowers of Laudholm Farms in June. Left to right and down: Blue Flag Iris, Blue Eyed Grass, Rose Pagonia Orchid, Wild Rose, Sheep Laurel, Nightshade, Owl Clover, Tall Cinquefoil, and Milkweed. All were taken with the Sony RX10iv and all at 600mm equivalent. Program mode. Processed in Polarr and assembled in FrameMagic. Ah to be in Maine in June.

Calico Pennant…

Calico Pennant, Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Area, W. Kennebunk Maine

This shot is from my photoprowl and dragonfly hunt to Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area last week. One of the earliest dragonflies to fly in Southern Maine, and certainly the most colorful early dragon…the Calico Pennant. I have suggested before that it really should be renamed the Valentine Skimmer because of the hearts on its abdomen and hindwings. No one in the powers that rule the Odonatal world listens to me though 🙂 You only have to see one perched, twisting in the wind, to know why it is a “pennant”. Sony RX10iv at 600mm. Program mode with Program Shift for greater depth of field. 1/160th @ f7.1 @ ISO 100. Processed in Polarr.

Green Metallic Bee on Cinquefoil…

Cinquefoil with Green Bee, Laudholm Farms, Wells Maine

I was photographing the Cinquefoil in the butterfly meadow at Laudholm Farms (Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve) in Wells, Maine, when I spotted this Green Metallic Bee on one. I thought it flew before I could get focused and press the shutter. In fact I spent several moments trying, unsuccessfully, to find where the bee went for another try. When I looked at the pics at home, I did manage to catch this one shot of the bee departing. I like Green Metallic Bees…all of the metallic bees in fact. I rarely see them because they are so very small, but I delight in every one I do see. This shot, with the beautiful Cinquefoil, is even more special. 🙂 Sony RX10iv at 590mm. Program mode with Program Shift for greater depth of field. 1/1000th @ f8 @ ISO 100. Processed in Polarr.

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing, Laudholm Farms, Wells, Maine.

While out looking for orchids in the bog at Laudholm Farms (Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve), I came up on a small flock of Cedar Waxwings that flew ahead of me down either side of the trail and perched for a few photos. It was midday and the light was harsh, but it does bring out every pin-feather of the breast. Sony RX10iv at 600mm. Program mode. 1/800th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Polarr. View large for the feather detail. 🙂

Monarch!

Monarch Butterfly, Laudholm Farms, Wells, Maine

The three Monarchs I saw yesterday in the butterfly meadow at Laudholm Farms (Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve) are one more than all the Monarchs I saw last season…so I take that as a good sign. The Milkweed is just beginning to bloom at Laudholm, with lots more flowers to come. Hopefully that will mean lots more Monarchs. Last year’s low numbers had many of us here in Southern Maine seriously concerned for the East Coast population of Monarchs. Sony RX10iv at 600mm. Program mode. 1/640th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Polarr and assembled in FrameMagic.

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrow, Emmon’s Preserve, Kennebunkport, Maine

I went to Emmon’s Preserve (Kennenbunkport Conservation Trust) mainly to look for early dragon- and damselflies…especially hoping for a River Jewelwing, which I have seen there one other year in June. No River Jewelwings…I did see a very early Ebony Jewelwing…and this Song Sparrow sat up for a portrait, and allowed me in pretty close before it sought the safety of deeper brush. I like this kind of shot, with every pinfeather sharp. Sony RX10iv at 600mm. Program mode. 1/500th @ f4 @ ISO 400. Processed in Polarr.

Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly, Emmon’s Preserve, Kennebunkport Maine

Just the other day, in a Day Poem, I was complaining about Tiger Swallowtails. Maybe simplest to quote the poem.

I have seen, over the past week,

at least a hundred Tiger Swallow-

tail butterflies. They are everywhere

I go. But do you think even a single

one will perch and pose for a picture?

Of course not! I will tell you, if I

were in charge of Swallowtails things

would be different by far. But then

I suppose, all things considered, that

it is better that I am not. I do not know

how I would cope with such a serious

obligation and fearsome responsibility.

Well, yesterday, I found this nice fresh Swallowtail, apparently somewhat drunk on the nectar of these lovely pinkish flowers in the overgrown (intentionally) meadow above the Conservation Trust buildings at Emmon’s Preserve in Kennebunkport. I am embarrassed to say I do not know what type of flowers they are. They adorn waist high weedy looking plants with red stems and pale leaves growing in a dense mass along the trail in full sun. They remind me a bit of blueberries, but I don’t think they are. And evidently the Swallowtails really like them. This one was flitting from cluster to cluster and hanging on for 30 seconds or more, before fluttering on to the next cluster. (The plant is not, however, listed in any list of flowers Swallowtails like I could find in a Google search…I did try that.) Whatever the plant is, I appreciate it as a background to my first Swallowtail pictures of the season. Sony RX10iv at 600mm. Program mode. 1/500th @ f4 @ ISO 125. Processed in Polarr.